Sermon Discussions

WE BEGIN WITH REST - Mark 2:27–28, Luke 6:5, Luke 13:14, Isaiah 58:13–14 Jesus’ words, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” say to the Christian, “Find your weekly refreshment in ME!” In a seventh–day Sabbath, the emphasis is on six days of work first, and then the Sabbath day for rest. The work comes first, and then the rest. Jesus redefined the cycle of the work week: we rest first, then we work! The Christian’s “Lord’s Day” is typically Sunday: He rose on the first day of the week. His notable appearances to the disciples were on the first days of the week. Pentecost was on the first day of the week. The early church gathered on this new “Lord’s Day”—Sunday. Now, we aren’t to wrangle about days of worship (Romans 14). In fact, the early church would gather on every day to worship Jesus together. But the fact remains: Sunday is...

A FAULTY SYSTEM OF WORKS - Luke 6:9–11, Luke 6:5, Ephesians 2:8–9, Titus 3:4–6 Jesus’ words, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” say to the religious person, “We are saved by grace, and not by works.” Sometimes our actions have the exact opposite result than we desired or expected: Trying to slowly ease yourself into a cold pool. Once your foot feels the cold, you aren’t getting in. Trying to diet by only taking a small sample of a delectable chocolate cake in order to ease your temptation. Once you’ve tasted it, you are going to devour a huge piece. Trying to deal with your tantrum throwing toddler by getting angry and yelling at them, and you end up freaking out right alongside them, being reduced to their same infantile level of insanity. The Pharisees legalistic control of the Sabbath achieved exactly opposite of what they intended. They wanted to...

CHRIST OUR CREATOR -  Exodus 20:11, Deuteronomy 5:15, Isaiah 58:13–14, Luke 6:5 Jesus’ words, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” say to the theologian, “Jesus is God!” The Greek word “Lord” in the New Testament (“kurios”) has the basic meaning of “Master” – but is also used to translate the Old Testament’s “Yahweh,” or “the Lord,” as most Bible render it. Not only was Jesus laying claim to the Sabbath as its new Master, He was also making a divine claim—that He was God! Consider this: Throughout the Bible, God lays claim to the first portion of every good thing He gives His people, so they would remember Him. God gave all the trees to Adam, except one The first city of Joshua’s conquest, Jericho, was to be given to God and not touched as booty The first–born children required a special sacrifice to give thanks to God for rescuing His Firstborn...

CHRIST OUR IDENTITY - Exodus 31:13, Luke 6:5, Galatians 2:20 Jesus’ words, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” say to the Jew, “Let Me be your identity!” God’s covenant with Moses was the sign of the Sabbath. It was given to remind Israel of their Creator. Unlike Abraham’s sign of circumcision, which was private and hidden, Moses’ sign was public and visible. The Sabbath became the national sign—how Israel was best identified among all the other nations on earth. And Jesus laid claim to their most visible, national identification! Some national holidays in America have been redefined over time: Labor Day is no longer a day for labor unions to organize and have member meetings. It is now a day to mark the end of summer and have a BBQ. Columbus Day is being widely replaced with “Indigenous People’s Day.” Thanksgiving is less about giving thanks to God for our nation, and...

SABBATH SURRENDER - Luke 6:2 & 7, John 11:47–48, Luke 22:25–26, James 4:13–15 Jesus’ words, “The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” say to the Pharisee, “You are not large and in charge – I am!” The term “Lord” in the New Testament is used for both, “Master” and “Lord God.” The simplest meaning of “Lord of the Sabbath” is that Jesus is claiming to have authority to call the shots on this most critical day. But, the Pharisees wouldn’t give up their self–appointed position as “masters” of the Sabbath easily! You see, the Pharisees saw it at their duty to enforce the Sabbath, and the other details of the Law of Moses, in order to protect Israel from another exile to a foreign nation. They were the “masters” of the Sabbath—as a matter of national survival! But, because they weren’t simply trusting God’s word, they ruined the intent of the Sabbath for everyone! What...

In the Message/Study/Sermon given at Calvary Chapel Oxnard on Sunday November 20, 2014, I mentioned the, “four main camps about how to understand it” and that I would put up a blog post briefly summarizing them. Here it is . . . Those four main methods of interpreting the Book of Revelation are the Preterist, Historicist, Idealist, and Futurist interpretive methodologies. Futurist The Futurist view understands the Book of Revelation as being a prophecy of events regarding the End Times, and that most of the book has yet to be fulfilled. The Futurist view understands that in the Bible, prophecy speaks of patterns and that there may be several iterations of a prophecy’s fulfillment in history. But these intervening iterations point to a grand climax in which the prophecy finds its culmination. Think of the earlier iterations as foreshocks that harbinger the main quake. The Futurist view understand the majority of Revelation taking...

Warm Up As a youth, how did you handle others with authority such as teachers, police, etc.? What about now? How does how we submit to proper earthly authority reflect on our submission to God? Hebrews 2:5 What does the phrase “the world to come” refer to? Who has that age NOT been set in subjection to? Reading on in v. 9, Who has it been set in subjection to? What does this reveal about His identity; i.e. – Is He an angel? Hebrews 2:6-9 The author quotes Psalm 8. Read the Psalm. What does David say there? How does the writer of Hebrews use the Psalm; what point does he make from it? David’s use of the word “man” here refers to humanity/mankind. What does he say was our original destiny? What happened to God’s original plan/intent for us? The writer of this letter takes the “man” of Psalm 8 & uses it prophetically of Who? From the perspective of this passage, what did...

INTRO / Warm Up Have you ever gone boating or sailing? Have you ever driven or piloted a ship / boat? If so, how was it different from driving a car? What challenges does a lake or sea present to piloting a ship? Hebrews 2:1-4 Have you had a period of ‘drifting’ (AKA ‘backsliding’) from the Lord? If so, how long did it last? What caused it? How did you come out of it? What ‘currents’ or pressures work on the followers of Jesus to make drifting possible? What’s the special danger in drifting for a long time? How is it progressive? What are some of the signs someone is drifting from the Lord? What remedy does v. 1 give to avoiding spiritual drift? What are some practical ways to “give more earnest heed to” the Gospel? Wrap Up What role ought we play in one another’s lives in regard to the danger of drifting? ...

Open Many of the appliances that have become standard around the house have made life easier. What are some and how have they made things easier? Without them, how would life be different? What skills would we need to have & how much more time? At what age did you come to faith in Jesus? Briefly (a couple minutes) describe how you came to the Lord; was there some crisis event or realization that was crucial? Digging In Read John 10:7-18 & Psalm 23:1-4 Since Psalm 23 was well-known in Jesus’ day, when He claimed to be the Good Shepherd, what did the people understand He was claiming? In this passage in John 10, what does Jesus says his being the Good Shepherd means for His people? In v. 10, what does Jesus announce He came to bring? Since everyone already has life (they’re alive) what does Jesus mean? (Consider what Jesus said to Nicodemus in John 3) Why does He add, “....

To Leaders – In these discussion sheets that will be provided for the next three months, feel free to use whatever questions you want. Don’t feel obligated to use them all. As you get to know your group, you’ll get a sense for what kinds of questions generate good discussion and which don’t. So be free to personalize the material as suits your group. We will usually start off with some general questions that most if not all can answer because they require little Bible knowledge. This is to get the group to open up & share. They will usually relate to the study in some way (but not always). Then we’ll move into more interpretive questions & ask how points can be applied to our lives today.      I recommend you pick up one of the discussion sheets as you come to service on Sunday and as you hear the message, jot...